Category Archives : Press Releases


Ambitious and gifted young people campaign for right to study

Hundreds of young people who have grown up in the UK but fall outside the eligibility criteria for student loans, are calling on universities to create scholarship places to allow them to continue their education.

 

Without financial support from universities, many high-achieving young migrants who have lived in this country most of their lives will be blocked from studying for degrees, and from pursuing professional careers. This is an issue which affects young people across the country, but is particularly acute in London, because of its richly diverse population.

 

In the latest phase of its ‘Young, Gifted and Blocked’ campaign launched today, over 100 London-based members of Let us Learn (see below) have personally signed a letter which has today been sent to the vice chancellors of the top universities in the capital.

 

They are calling on universities to create scholarships which would end the educational limbo that is preventing them from continuing their education, because the criteria for receiving a student loan are narrowly drawn.

 

‘We are writing to ask you to help long-standing migrants like us continue our studies. By doing so, you will also be helping your university ensure it is able to recruit talented and diverse young people, who are often under represented in further education.

 

‘Many of us come from families where we would be the first members to go to university; all of us believe passionately in the importance of obtaining a degree, and are keen to have the opportunity to pursue our educational and career ambitions.’

 

Signatories to the letter include would-be doctors, scientists, and lawyers – plus a young woman with ambitions to be the first black British astronaut.

 

Agnes Harding, 18 who lives in Barking and Dagenham, and achieved straight As in her physics, chemistry and maths A-levels this year, has had offers from four Russell Group universities to study physics. It is her ambition to follow in the footsteps of British astronauts Major Tim Peake and Dr Helen Sharman.

 

Agnes says:

 

‘I want to study physics because it is my ambition to be an astronaut. I am a very curious person and a bit of an adrenalin junkie. I love knowledge and expanding my understanding of the universe. I would be fascinated to conduct research in space to discover what’s out there.’

 

Although Agnes has lived in the UK since she was four, she does not qualify for a student loan, and so has not been able to take up any of her university offers. She also faces paying international fees, which can be several times higher than the £9,000 a year maximum charged to home students.

 

Agnes features in ‘Young, Gifted and Blocked’, a three-minute film produced by Let us Learn, which is also launched today. The film highlights the plight of young people like her, and urges universities to help them by setting up scholarship schemes to enable young migrants to continue learning.

 

See film here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BumdwKTbyZQ

 

 

The film also features 20-year old Arkam Babar, who wants to work in the field of climate change research but was left in educational limbo after he found out he didn’t qualify for a student loan.  In the weeks since the film was shot, Arkam has been awarded a scholarship by Kings College London, and is now delighted to have started a geography degree.

 

Arkam says:

 

‘Before I was awarded the scholarship by Kings College London, I had little hope of being able to study, which was devastating as my family has always placed a strong emphasis on education. I had already previously had to turn down a university place, when I first found out I didn’t qualify for a student loan, which was very hard for me. The Kings scholarship has transformed my situation. I have now started my course and can look forward to pursuing my career ambitions. I only hope that more young people get the chance that I have been given to pursue their educational dreams.’

 

Let us Learn is calling on universities across the country to follow the lead set by Kings College London, by creating similar funding arrangements.

 

The Let us Learn campaign was launched in 2014 by the award-winning charity Just for Kids Law.

 

Just for Kids Law founder and director Shauneen Lambe says:

 

‘We have now been contacted by over 600 ambitious young people who – having studied hard and done well at school – want nothing more than to be able to take up hard-won university places. They have been to school here and lived in the UK most of their lives. Yet, when it comes to going to university, they are treated as overseas students – they cannot get a student loan, and can be charged international fees by universities, which are often two or three times the £9,000 a year paid by other students. There are very few other funding options available to young people in this situation. Unless universities recognise the problem and set up the kind of schemes that Kings College London is offering, large numbers of young people like them will continue to be denied the opportunity of a university education and blocked from professional careers.

 

‘We don’t think our country can afford to let so much talent and ambition go to waste. Universities rightly stress their commitment to social inclusion and increasing their recruitment of under-represented groups. The Let us Learn campaigners are taking them at their word, and have written to vice-chancellors, calling on them to prove they are serious about diversity by creating scholarships so that many more young people like them can continue learning.’

 

For more information or to arrange interviews with members of Let us Learn, contact Fiona Bawdon, 07740 644474, fionabawdon@justforkids.org, or Caroline O’Dwyer, 07984 095793, carolineo’dwyer@justforkidslaw.org

 

Notes to editors

 

  1. A copy of the ‘Young, Gifted and Blocked’ letter and briefing paper sent by Let us Learn to members of the University of London can be found here: letter briefing paper.

 

  1. Details of the Kings College London ‘Sanctuary’ scholarship scheme are available here:

 

http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/fees-and-funding/student-funding/scholarships-and-bursaries/scholarships/sanctuary-scholarship.aspx

 

 

Two members of Let us Learn (Arkam Babar, studying geography, and Sharon Akaka, studying history) who were previously blocked from continuing their studies have been able to take up places at Kings College London this year, thanks to funding provided under this scheme.

 

  1. Details of the ‘long residence’ criteria for government student loans are available here:

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/517544/bis-16-199-new-eligibility-category-government-response.pdf

 

 

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2016/584/pdfs/uksi_20160584_en.pdf

 

 

  1. The ‘Young, Gifted and Blocked’ film was made for Just for Kids Law by Contra Agency (http://film.contra.agency).

It was generously funded by The Robertson Trust as part of a self-development award, won by Tashi Tahir, who is also one of the participants in the film. Tashi is now studying maths at St Andrews University, Scotland, thanks to a scholarship from The Robertson Trust.

 

  1. Just for Kids Law is an award-winning youth justice charity. www.justforkidslaw.org

 

 

  1. Let us Learn is a youth-led organisation, founded under the auspices of Just for Kids Law in 2014, to campaign for equal access to education. www.letuslearn.study

 

 

 


Legal action as part of a campaign by Just for Kids Law prompts Islington Council into urgent review of children held in police cells overnight in the borough

PRESS RELEASE

25 July 2016

 

Islington council has a long standing poor track record for failing to accommodate children from the police station, but evidence shows that councils nationwide are routinely not complying with their legal duties, by failing to provide alternative accommodation for arrested children.

The legal action with lawyers Hodge, Jones and Allen and barristers from renowned human rights set, Doughty Street chambers, is part of Just for Kids Law’s ‘No child in cells’ campaign, launched today, calling for an end to the widespread practice of detaining children, some as young as eight, in adult cells.

The campaign includes a short video created by digital agency Adjust Your Set dramatising the impact and distress that being kept in a cell can cause children and their families. http://www.justforkidslaw.org/nochildincells

Just for Kids Law, the award-winning charity, will also call on the new Secretary of State for Education and the Home Secretary to use their legal powers under the Children Act 1989, to mandate local authorities to comply with the law relating to children detained at the police station.

Just for Kids Law director Shauneen Lambe says:

‘A police cell designed for an adult is no place for a child. Everyone, from the new Prime Minister to the police lead for children, agrees that children and young people are particularly vulnerable and need to be kept safe after arrest – yet laws designed to protect them are being ignored up and down the country, every day of the year. It is particularly appalling that children as young as eight are being kept in cells overnight; often it is because Local Authorities are failing to accommodate them when asked to do so. That is why we have begun action against Islington Council; we will take similar steps against other local authorities, unless they start complying with their legal duties.’

The Islington case relates to a vulnerable 14 year old boy who was kept in a cell overnight on multiple occasions since March this year, because Islington failed to provide any alternative accommodation for him.

There is an ‘absolute duty’ under section 21(2)(b) of the Children Act 1989 for the local authority to provide accommodation when requested to do so by the police.

In response to a FOI request from Just for Kids Law, the Metropolitan Police confirmed that last year, Islington council received 94 requests from them to provide a bed for a child being held at the police station – yet they did not accommodate a single one of these children.

The Children’s Commissioner for England, Anne Longfield, said in a witness statement:

‘Custody suites are not designed to accommodate children….very few have facilities specifically for children; the environment is accordingly an intimidating one. Cell areas lack comfort and the provision of emotional support is almost entirely absent.’

In its formal response to the legal action, Islington council said it had: ‘decided to set up a formal review, which will have the remit to investigate, learn from and make recommendations in relation not only to the facts of the present case but also in relation to any wider issues there may be in Islington.’

Louise King, Director of the Children’s Rights Alliance for England (CRAE), said:

“No child should be locked up in a police cell simply because alternative accommodation isn’t available. CRAE’s research has revealed that last year in London alone nearly 8,000 children were detained in police cells overnight – including three 11 year old girls. Police, local authorities and politicians urgently need to work together to put an end to this.”

Although the legal challenge is in London this is a nationwide issue. In 2011-12, 40,000 children – 800 a week – were detained at police stations overnight. *.

For more information contact Caroline O’Dwyer, carolineo’dwyer@justforkidslaw.org 07984 095793 or Fiona Bawdon, fionabawdon@justforkidslaw.org; 020 3174 2279;

Notes for editors

  1. Just for Kids Law is a London-based, award-winning charity, which supports young people facing difficulties in their lives. justforkidslaw.org
  2. CRAE merged into Just for Kids Law last year. They work with over 150 organisational and individual members to promote children’s rights, making them one of the biggest children’s rights coalitions in the world.
  3. Theresa May’s letter to local authorities in January 2015 can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/401178/Joint_letter_from_the_Home_Secretary__the_Education_Secretary.pdf
  4. *http://www.ncb.org.uk/media/1150494/appgc_police_data_report_july_2014_final.pdf (page 12)
  5. Section 38(6) of Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 states: Where a custody officer authorises an arrested juvenile to be kept in police detention under subsection (1) above, the custody officer shall, unless he certifies—(a)that, by reason of such circumstances as are specified in the certificate, it is impracticable for him to do so; or (b)in the case of an arrested juvenile who has attained the age of 12 years, that no secure accommodation is available and that keeping him in other local authority accommodation would not be adequate to protect the public from serious harm from him, secure that the arrested juvenile is moved to local authority accommodation.
  6. Section 21(2)(b) of the Children Act 1989 states that ‘every local authority must receive and provide accommodation for children whom they are requested to receive under section 38(6) of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984.
  7. Legal representation has been provided by Hodge, Jones and Allen Solicitors and Caoilfhionn Gallagher and Mary-Rachel McCabe, barristers at Doughty Street Chambers.
  8. Adjust Your Set is a digital content agency – learn more about their work at www.adjustyourset.com
  9. Although many local councils are failing to accommodate children held at the police station there are some examples of good practice – such as a protocol that has been set up by Greater Manchester Police.

 


‘Young, gifted and blocked’ campaigners graduate from Just for Kids Law’s groundbreaking leadership training

Press release 14 July 2016

‘Young, gifted and blocked’ campaigners graduate from Just for Kids Law’s groundbreaking leadership training

Lord Kerr, Justice of the UK Supreme Court, ‘graduated’ 11 successful candidates in a special ceremony held yesterday evening.

Eleven young people who are campaigning for equal access to education, have completed a unique six-month leadership course, designed by Just for Kids Law founder and barrister Shauneen Lambe.

They are part of the award-winning Let us Learn campaign, which involves hundreds of young people who grew up in the UK, but are unable to take up university places because they fall outside restrictive student loan eligibility criteria.

These 11 young leaders were celebrated on Wednesday 13 July, at a ceremony attended by their families and supporters. Despite having the talent and ambition to go to university, this may be the only chance some of them have to invite their families to attend a graduation ceremony.

They were presented with graduation certificates by Lord Kerr, Justice of the Supreme Court, the UK’s highest court.

Each of the 11 young people achieved good A-level grades, but has faced difficult barriers to achieving their ambition of going to university.

Among those graduated by Lord Kerr on Wednesday were:

– Dami Makinde, who is 22 and lives in Ilford. Dami won a place to study sociology and criminology at Royal Holloway College in 2015, but has been unable to take it up because she isn’t eligible for a student loan. She is currently working as project coordinator for the Let us Learn campaign.

– Ijeoma Moore, 21, who lives in Barking, wants to be a psychologist, but isn’t able to go to university because of lack of access to student finance. In May 2016, Ijeoma told her story to an audience of 6,000 people at the London Copperbox Arena (see below).

– Emmanuel Opoku, 21, has just completed his first year at Imperial College London, where he is studying chemistry. Emmanuel was only able to take up his place after a two-year delay, thanks to a Tiko Foundation scholarship, which generously covers the £26,000 ‘overseas rate’ fees he is charged by Imperial. He used crowdfunding to raise money for his living expenses during his studies.

Just for Kids Law founder Shauneen Lambe says:

‘They are a fantastic group of ambitious young people, who would love to continue their studies and have the chance to follow their dreams. They have been blocked from university, but are taking every opportunity to learn and develop new skills – which is why we wanted to offer them this leadership training. As well as helping them become leaders of their own lives and in their own communities, the training will help make them more resilient and confident – skills which are invaluable given the obstacles many of them continue to face with their education.’

Ijeoma says:

‘Shauneen really challenged us to think about the kind of people we want to be in the world, and how to overcome any setbacks we face. The course gave me a clearer idea of who I am, my own strengths, and who I want to be. I was really nervous about standing up in front of thousands of people at the London Mayoral Hustings, but with the confidence this programme gave me, I knew I could do it.’

The course was designed by Shauneen, and was built on the principles of the ‘True North’ leadership programme, taught at Harvard University by Prof Bill George.

For more information contact Fiona Bawdon, fionabawdon@justforkidslaw.org; 020 3174 2279; Caroline O’Dwyer, carolineo’dwyer@justforkidslaw.org: 07984 095793

Notes for editors

1. Just for Kids Law is a London-based, award-winning charity, which supports young people facing difficulties in their lives. www.justforkidslaw.org

2. Funding for the Let us Learn leadership training was provided by Unbound Philanthropy.

3. The Let us Learn campaign was founded in 2014, and currently involves over 400 young migrants, who have faced obstacles going to university because of restrictive eligibility criteria for student loans.

Let Us Learn

4. Shauneen Lambe is the founder and director of Just for Kids Law. In 2011, she was sponsored by the World Economic Forum to attend the Global Leadership and Public Policy for the 21st Century course at Harvard Kennedy School of Governance. In 2015, she became an Eisenhower Fellow, where one of her commitments was to mentor young people into leadership roles.

5. The Right Hon the Lord Kerr of Tonaghmore was one of the inaugural Justices of the Supreme Court of the UK when it was founded on 1 October 2009. He was previously a law lord. He is an Eisenhower Fellow.

6. See link for Ijeoma Moore addressing the London Mayoral Hustings at the Copper Box Arena (starts around 1,57 minutes):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gzigbrejchkspeaking

7. Just for Kids Law is based near Euston, in office space donated pro bono by the leading law firm Hodge Jones & Allen. www.hja.net

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Award-winning charity targets would-be lawyers with legal equivalent of ‘Teach First’ graduate scheme.

Just for Kids Law is recruiting would-be lawyers to work as community-based trainee ‘youth advocates’ for a year.

 

Just for Kids Law is today (Monday 16 May) launching its groundbreaking ‘Advocacy Year’ scheme, thanks to funding from the Big Lottery. Under the scheme, graduate recruits will receive a month’s intensive training, before working alongside the charity’s outreach team for 10 months.

 

The posts will be open to all graduates, but the advocacy and negotiation skills learned are likely to be of particular appeal to anyone seeking a legal career.  Advocates will be given basic training in the law relating to education, community care, youth justice, immigration and welfare benefits. They will be paid a stipend for the year equivalent to the London living wage.

 

Just for Kids Law director Shauneen Lambe says:

 

‘The legal field is becoming increasingly competitive and we believe Advocacy Year will appeal to graduates who want to stand out to future employers. Law firms and chambers want applicants who can show they are good at thinking on their feet and responding well in different situations. These skills are equally vital for our youth advocates. They have strong communication skills, which means that as well as supporting intensely vulnerable young people, advocates are equipped to negotiate successfully with hard-pressed professionals, such as head teachers and school governors, or social workers.’

 

The pilot has already received support from within the legal profession.

 

Michael Bowes QC, joint head of Outer Temple Chambers, says:

 

“Advocacy Year is a brilliant opportunity for graduates who are considering becoming lawyers to learn practical advocacy skills by helping young people in need.  Being selected to be on Advocacy Year would be a definite plus point on anyone’s CV.”

 

Advocacy Year has been two years in the planning and is being run initially as a three-year pilot. If the pilot is successful, it is hoped to roll the model out to other areas of the UK. During the pilot phase, Advocacy Year trainees will be based in Just for Kids Law’s new office in Canning Town – in space provided by Community Links – an area known for having high levels of poverty and deprivation.

 

Advocacy Year is supported by an advisory board which will monitor and review the scheme as it progresses. Inaugural board members include Daniel Klier, Global Head of Strategy at HSBC, who first developed the idea along with Shauneen Lambe, as a way of increasing the number of disadvantaged young people to benefit from Just for Kids Law’s support.

 

Shauneen Lambe says:

 

‘The work of our existing team of youth advocates is at the heart of everything that Just for Kids Law stands for. They help some of the most desperate and disadvantaged young people get their lives back on track. However, our resources are always at full stretch and we have to turn away many young people who would benefit from our support. The Advocacy Year scheme will enable us to make Just for Kids Law’s resources go further, and to support an additional 1,000 young, vulnerable people over the life of the pilot.’

 

The deadline for applications for the three initial Advocacy Year posts is 13 June; interviews will be held on 30th June and Friday 1st July, start date: Monday 5th September. Three further advocates will be recruited each year in 2017 and in 2018.

 

For more information about Advocacy Year, contact Fiona Bawdon, Just for Kids Law communications co-director, fionabawdon@justforkidslaw.org; 020 3174 2279; 07740 644474.

 

Notes for editors:

 

  1. Just for Kids Law is a charity that provides advocacy and legal support to disadvantaged young people. www.justforkidslaw.org

 

  1. Advocacy Year applications can be made here: http://www.justforkidslaw.org/support-our-work/vacancies

 

  1. Shauneen Lambe was chosen as an Ashoka fellow in 2012, one of 31 Ashoka social entrepreneurs in the UK. Ashoka is the largest network of social entrepreneurs worldwide, with nearly 3,000 Ashoka Fellows in 70 countries putting their system-changing ideas into practice on a global scale. In 2014, Just for Kids Law went through the Ashoka Globalizer programme to develop a scaling strategy, with the support of business advisors and consultants from McKinsey. www.ashoka.org

 

  1. Daniel Klier and Shauneen Lambe are both World Economic Forum Young Global Leaders, which was set up as an integral part of the World Economic Forum Young Global Leaders project.

 

  1. For details of Big Lottery support for Advocacy Year, see: https://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/funding/search-past-grants/project-details?appid=298362

 

  1. Community Links is an innovative east London charity running a variety of community projects.

 

 

 

 


Youth justice charity and education campaigners welcome policy change, giving those age 24+ greater access to student loans.

Press release – issued 3 May 2016

Last-minute government concession means thousands more young people now have chance of university – but many still remain blocked from continuing their education, warn Just for Kids Law and Let us Learn.

The Department for Business Innovation & Skills has revised its eligibility criteria for higher education student support, following last year’s Supreme Court ruling that the existing policy was unlawful and should be changed (1).

After consultation, the government has introduced a new ‘long residency’ qualification for student loans, allowing over 18s who were born abroad but have lived in the UK half their life to apply. Applicants’ time in this country must include at least ‘three years’ lawful ordinary residence’, in order for them to be eligible for a loan. (2)

The change will be introduced in time for the 2016/2017 academic year.

In a welcome change of heart, proposals have been dropped which would have meant over 24s facing the tougher criteria of having lived in the UK for 20 years in order to qualify.

In announcing the rethink, the government said it had been ‘persuaded by the argument’ (p12) made by respondents that the proposed 20 year rule would ‘create a cliff edge for those aged 25 years and above’; and was ‘too high a barrier and directly discriminated against mature learners.’ (p11)

Joel Carter, Just for Kids Law, youth projects manager, said:

‘We would like to thank the universities minister Jo Johnson for listening to our concerns about the impact of the 20 year rule on older applicants. We also welcome the fact that these new criteria officially recognise it was unfair for our government to deny so many students who have lived in this country for most of their lives the right to apply for a student loan. It is good news for all of us that many more of these motivated and aspirational young people will now be able to realise their ambitions of going to university.’

 

Let us Learn project worker Dami Makinde said:

” I know of several Let us Learn campaigners who are older than 24, who will no longer have to clock up 20 years in this country before they can go to university. This is very welcome news. However, if our government is serious about encouraging integration and social mobility, it needs to do more to tackle the remaining barriers to education. The eligibility criteria for student finance are still too restrictive. Too many young people who have always thought of themselves as British and know no other home are facing delays or being blocked altogether from continuing their education.’ 

 

Notes for editors

 

(1) R (on the application of Tigere (Appellant) v Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (Respondent); [2015] UKSC 57.

 

(2) Department for Business Innovation & Skills, New eligibility category for higher education student support, Government response, April 2016 can be found here

 

(3) Just for Kids Law is an award-winning youth justice charity. Let us Learn is a youth-led campaign for equal access to education for all. It was founded by Just for Kids Law in 2014. www.justforkidslaw.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Statement from Just for Kids Law, following Supreme Court judgment in Jogee

Just for Kids Law welcomes the decision of the Supreme Court in Jogee

 

Just for Kids Law was one of two organisations which intervened in the case, along with Jengba (Joint Enterprise Not Guilty by Association).

 

We did not act for either of the parties (Jogee or Ruddock), and our intervention was not based on the facts of these cases.

 

We intervened because in our experience of representing young people in the criminal justice system we have seen a huge increase in young people charged and convicted of joint enterprise offences over the last 10 years. It has been disproportionately used against young, black men – leading to miscarriages of justice.

 

Francis FitzGibbon QC of Doughty Street Chambers (who led the team of pro bono barristers for Just for Kids Law) said:

 

‘This decision marks a sea change in a highly controversial area of law. It corrects an historic mistake in the law of joint enterprise, which until now had exposed people to being found guilty of the most serious offences on the weakest legal basis. The effect of the Supreme Court’s decision is that a member of a group cannot be found guilty of an offence unless there is proof that he or she positively intended that it should be committed. Mere foresight of what someone else might do is not enough. This will have a huge impact on the young and vulnerable clients that Just for Kids Law represents, who can find themselves unwittingly drawn into dangerous situations, and will now get better protection from the law.’

 

Just for Kids Law director Shauneen Lambe said:

 

‘In the last 10 years, Just for Kids Law has seen a rapid increase in children being charged and convicted of the gravest of offences, including murder, under the controversial extended principle of joint enterprise, which means that they did not even have to intend an offence to happen to be found guilty of it. This has led to numerous miscarriages of justice – with vulnerable and learning-disabled children locked up for crimes that they did not intend to happen nor were they directly involved in.

 

‘We are currently preparing an appeal for a young boy who was convicted with four others of murder. Our client has learning difficulties and ADHD. CCTV footage played to the jury shows him exiting the building at the same time as another teenager brings in a knife. Despite this, he was convicted of murder under the principle of joint enterprise. He is now serving a life sentence for a killing which he was not present at and nor did he intend. There are many other cases like his.’

 

Just for Kids Law’s evidence to the Supreme Court against the expanded use of joint enterprise included research by Dr Ben Crewe, Dr Susie Hulley and Ms. Serena Wright, from Cambridge University Institute of Criminology, demonstrating the disproportionate way that joint enterprise is used to convict young black men of serious crimes.

 

– A 16-prison study by Dr Crewe of men convicted on the basis of joint enterprise found white prisoners were under-represented, while the percentage of black prisoners was three times higher than in the general prison population.

 

The study found: ‘38.5 per cent [of joint enterprise prisoners] self-declared as white, compared to 72.4 per cent in the general male prison population, while 37.2 per cent self-declared as black/black British, a figure that is almost three times the proportion of black/black British prisoners in the general prison population (12.8 per cent).’ (‘Joint Enterprise: The implications of an unfair and unclear law,’ 2015, Ben Crewe, et al, Criminal Law Review 249, 261.)

 

– The same 16-prison study by Dr Crewe also found that nearly one in five of those convicted on joint enterprise was 18 or younger when sentenced; all of them were age 25 or younger.

 

Just for Kids Law was represented in the case pro bono by Doughty Street barristers Francis FitzGibbon QC, Caoilfhionn Gallagher, Daniella Waddup; and Garden Court’s Joanne Cecil. Our in house lawyer was Jennifer Twite.

 

For more information, contact: Fiona Bawdon; fionabawdon@justforkidslaw.org; 07740 644474; 020 3174 2279

 

 

Notes for editors

 

  1. Just for Kids Law is an award-winning charity which supports children and young people in difficulty. www.justforkidslaw.org

 

  1. Ben Crewe and the research from the Institute of Criminology can be found here:

 

http://www.crim.cam.ac.uk/people/academic_research/ben_crewe/

 

http://www.crim.cam.ac.uk/research/ltp_from_young_adulthood/evidence_to_justice_committee.pdf

 

  1. Copies of Just for Kids Law’s Supreme Court submission are available on request or can be accessed here: Jogee Just for Kids Law submissions.
  2. A PDF version of this statement can be accessed here: Jogee Just for Kids Law Statement

 


Award-winning charity launches youth justice ‘centre of excellence’

Youth Justice Legal Centre aims to raise standards in criminal courts and support lawyers doing vital work representing children and young people.

 

Lady Hale says ‘it can’t be right’ for barristers to use the youth court as a training ground, and called for family and criminal courts to learn from each other over protecting children.

 

Award-winning charity Just for Kids Law yesterday evening (Wednesday 25 November) marked the official launch of its Youth Justice Legal Centre, with a reception at the House of Lords, attended by Baroness Hale.

 

Speaking at the event, Baroness Hale of Richmond, the only female judge in the Supreme Court, said:

 

‘Most barristers who appear in the youth court are the most junior and least experienced. They are using it as a way of learning to do what they will be doing later in the adult courts. That can’t be right.’

 

She also called for consistency of treatment of children across the family and criminal court system, and for child defendants to have the same protections as child witnesses.

 

She said, child defendants ‘are often just as, if not more, vulnerable than children who are witnesses and just as in need of measures of assistance, yet they have less general support around them’.

 

The YJLC has been over a year in the planning and has already provided support to nearly 150 defence lawyers, youth offending teams, youth justice professionals, children and families, who contacted the centre in urgent need of expert advice.

 

YJLC’s experience is that children are being failed at every level of the criminal justice system, because of lack of awareness of their acute vulnerabilities (see below), and because the professionals dealing with them lack appropriate experience and expertise. Youth justice is a discrete and complex area of law, but there is no requirement on lawyers doing the work to have undergone any special training to ensure they are properly equipped.

 

In recent weeks, cases dealt with by YJLC include:

 

– A teenager arrested by police for obstructing a railway line when she tried to kill herself. Her mother contacted YJLC for advice on how to get her daughter out of the criminal justice system and into appropriate care and treatment.

 

 

– A 14 year old with ADHD who, during an eight-week trial was left to sit in the dock at the back of the court behind glass panels, away from his family and unable to communicate with his legal team.

 

– A 17 year old with ADHD and learning difficulties whose court hearing ran from 10am until 7.30pm. She later became so agitated while waiting for the judge’s decision, she attempted suicide in the cells.

 

– A barrister at the Old Bailey representing two young boys being held on remand, who needed expert advice on the complex law around bail for children in order to argue for their release.

 

YJLC director and youth justice barrister Kate Aubrey-Johnson says:

 

‘All the evidence shows that children who end up in court are among the most vulnerable in society, with a range of communication and other problems. On any objective basis, children should only be represented by the most expert and experienced lawyers. Yet the opposite is the case. At the moment, youth court work is low status and low paid. It the place where junior barristers are expected to learn their craft, before moving on to more prestigious adult work. One barrister recently described it as “a kindergarten for professionals to gain skills”. This has to change. There would be an outcry if paediatric medicine were seen as a training ground for inexperienced surgeons, but this is exactly what happens in the criminal justice system.’

 

YJLC is calling for lawyers acting for young people to sign up to a code of conduct. This would include being able to demonstrate expertise in youth justice law, and having undergone training in how to communicate effectively with young people.

 

In a recent study by the Institute for Criminal Policy Research (for the Bar Standards Board, see below), young defendants talked about their difficulties in following what was going on in their own trial.

 

One 16 year old said: ‘Adults might get the words but to teenagers like me, it was all long posh words.’ A 17 year old said: ‘You don’t really understand what they’re saying but they’re saying something about you, and then say they’ve made a decision.’ Another 17 year old described a judge as using ‘all these big fancy words”.

 

Kate Aubrey-Johnson says:

 

‘For many young people, what happens in court might as well be in a foreign language for all they understand what is going on. Lawyers acting for children need to be able to explain complex legal issues in straightforward language and to build trust and rapport with their clients in order to properly represent them.’

 

Ends

 

For more information, contact Fiona Bawdon, fionabawdon@justforkidslaw.org; 07740 644474; Caroline O’Dwyer, carolineo’dwyer@justforkidslaw.org  07984 095793

 

Notes for editors

 

  1. The Youth Justice Legal Centre provides legal information to lawyers and other professionals working with children in the criminal justice system. It was set up with funding from the Legal Education Foundation, The Mark Leonard Trust, Esmee Fairbairn Foundation, Network for Social Change  www.yjlc.uk

 

  1. The recent Bar Standards Board Youth Proceedings Advocacy Review drew attention to the extensive research evidence of the needs and vulnerabilities of children in the youth justice system (page 4). These include findings that: six in 10 have a communication difficulty; more than half come from deprived households; 76 per cent have an absent father; 33 per cent have an absent mother; a third of young men and 60 per cent of young women have been in local authority care; one third have a recognised special educational need; 30 per cent of persistent offenders have a learning disability; up to 75 per cent have suffered a traumatic brain injury; 31 per cent had mental health problems (compared with 10 per cent of the wider population). Copies of the BSB report are available here:

 

  1. Just for Kids Law is an award-winning charity which provides support, advice and legal representation to children and young people. www.justforkidslaw.org

 

  1. Kate Aubrey-Johnson is a barrister and mediator. She is director of the Youth Justice Legal Centre and currently on sabbatical from Garden Court Chambers.

 

  1. Lawyers working with children elsewhere in the justice system already have special training and accreditation. The Law Society’s Children’ Law Panel is an accreditation scheme for family lawyers. Crown Prosecutors and judges in the youth court also have special training. There is currently no equivalent for defence solicitors and barristers doing youth court work.

 


Just for Kids Law intervenes in Supreme Court joint enterprise case

 

Just for Kids Law is a charity specialising in representing and supporting children and young people in legal difficulty, including in the criminal justice system.

As well as giving individual support, a key part of what we do is strategic litigation, where we bring carefully-selected legal cases over issues which affect large numbers of young people.

 

On Tuesday 27 October 2015, we are intervening in the Supreme Court case of Jogee, which involves a challenge to the controversial doctrine of joint enterprise.

 

Joint enterprise has emerged over recent years as a key concern of our young clients. Since 2011, we have been researching this issue, including contributing submissions to the House of Commons Justice Committee in February that year.

Our intervention in Jogee argues that children and adolescents do not have the same ability to predict events or understand the consequences of theirs and other people’s actions, in the way that an adult would. One of the fundamental principles of joint enterprise is that an individual foresaw that an associate of theirs was likely to commit an offence.

Our evidence to the court includes research from academics at Cambridge University demonstrating that because they lack the necessary cognitive development, young people may have genuine difficulties in foreseeing and therefore avoiding situations which may have the potential to escalate.

Our evidence to the court states:

‘A legal principle that is intended to deter potential offenders from committing offences needs to be readily understood by those at whom it is directed. If it cannot be because it is incoherent, and because those at whom it is aimed may have difficulties in understanding and acting upon it, it needs to be reviewed.

Just for Kids Law is being represented pro bono by Francis FitzGibbon QC Caoilfhionn Gallagher, and Daniella Waddoup of Doughty Street and Joanne Cecil of Garden Court Chambers.

For further information, contact Fiona Bawdon, FionaBawdon@justforkidslaw.org

Notes for editors

 

  1. R v Jogee UKSC 2015/0015 and Judicial College of the Privy Council Appeal in Ruddock v The Queen JCPC 2015/0020

 

  1. Joint enterprise is a common law doctrine where an individual can be jointly convicted of the crime of another, if the court decides they foresaw that the other party was likely to commit that crime.

 

  1. There are two interveners in this case, Just for Kids Law and the campaign group JENGbA. http://www.jointenterprise.co

 

  1. An intervention in a case happens where the court grants permission to one or more third-parties, which are not acting for either side in a dispute, to submit expert evidence which the judges believe may be helpful to them in reaching an informed decision.

 

  1. Just for Kids Law previously intervened in the Supreme Court case of Tigere, in July 2015.

 

  1. The appellant in the Jogee case is an adult. Just for Kids Law’s intervention is on the basis that the joint enterprise doctrine has a disproportionate impact on young people, because of the numbers of them who are currently affected by it.

 

  1. Our submissions are accompanied by submissions from three academics at the Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge, Dr Ben Crewe (Reader in Penology and Deputy Director of the Prisons Research Centre, Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge); Dr Susie Hulley (Research Associate, Research Centre, Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge); and Dr Serena Wright (Research Associate, Research Centre, Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge).

 


Two of the UK’s central children’s organisations join forces to strengthen the rights of children and young people

6 August 2015

 

The Children’s Rights Alliance for England (CRAE) is merging into Just for Kids Law it was announced today. Both charities know that children’s rights are a powerful tool in making life better for children and young people. They share the same ambition to achieve the full realisation of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) which the UK ratified in 1991.

Just for Kids Law provides direct advocacy support and legal representation to children and undertakes precedent setting strategic litigation for children’s rights (including successful interventions securing the rights of 17 year-olds in police custody). CRAE’s membership includes over 150 organisations and individual members making it one of the biggest children’s rights coalitions in the world. It fights for children’s rights by campaigning for the people in power to change things for children. It empowers children and those who care about them to push for the changes that can improve the lives of children and young people.

Both Just for Kids Law and CRAE will keep their distinct identities and brands.

The charities believe that joining together will strengthen both their work. CRAE’s public affairs and policy functions, and expertise on international human rights, will complement Just for Kids Law’s litigation capacity and direct service provision. Together, the combined charity will increase the impact of their work for children’s rights. It will create an organisation which combines strategic litigation, political affairs, policy and research alongside providing direct services to disadvantaged children and young people. The combined charity will raise awareness of children’s rights and support children to campaign on issues important to them.

We believe that together we can achieve more change and galvanise greater support for children’s rights. Through joining forces we will be a much stronger voice.

Just for Kids Law and CRAE share the same ethos and values and have collaborated before on many successful campaigns and legal interventions. We are keen to harness each other’s strengths while pooling resources in these financially straitened times. We will work together to achieve our common aim of protecting and promoting the rights of children.

We believe that it is particularly important at this time, with the Human Rights Act under threat, and many of the provisions in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child failing to be met in England, that there is the strongest possible voice to advocate for children’s human rights.

 

Carolyn Regan, Chair of the Just for Kids Law Board of Trustees, says: ‘We are delighted that CRAE is joining Just for Kids Law at this important time. Together we can continue to support, advocate and lobby for children and young people, and also lead on the policy work which underpins it all.’

 

Alison Marshall, Chair of CRAE said: ‘CRAE’s members are passionate about holding those in power to account on children’s rights as our track record and strong recent reports to the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child show. CRAE is joining with Just for Kids Law to strengthen the difference we can make for children and young people across the country.’

 

ENDS

 

Notes for editors

 

  1. Just for Kids Law delivers holistic, client-led support to children and young people from crisis to stability and onwards into independence. We do this through our innovative, community-based legal representation, advocacy and opportunities programme. We drive systemic change through strategic litigation and policy reform. We aim to be the UK’s leading experts in youth justice law, sharing our knowledge, expertise and model across the UK and the world. justforkidslaw.org

 

  1. CRAE is a membership body for organisations and individuals committed to our vision: a country that values and upholds every child’s human rights. CRAE protects the human rights of children by lobbying government and others who hold power, by bringing or supporting test cases and by using regional and international human rights mechanisms.  crae.org.uk

 

 

  1. For further information contact Caroline O’Dwyer, Just for Kids Law Communications Officer, at CarolineO’Dwyer@justforkidslaw.org, or on 07984 095793.

Supreme Court judgment re-opens door to university education to hundreds of British-educated teenagers

29 July 2015 – for immediate release

 

Supreme Court judgment re-opens door to university education to hundreds of British-educated teenagers

 

Just for Kids Law welcomes ruling that puts right to student loans back to pre-2012 position.

 

 

Beaurish Tigere, a former head girl, who is lawfully resident in the UK and has been here since age 6, has won the right to apply for a student loan to allow her to take up a university place to study international business management, following a successful Supreme Court challenge.

 

The ruling will benefit hundreds of other young people who have been similarly blocked from taking up university places.

 

The Zambian-born 20-year-old achieved A-level grades of A* A C, and has had five unconditional university offers.

 

Since 2012, young people who are lawfully resident in the UK, having been granted ‘discretionary’ or ‘limited’ leave to remain, are treated as overseas students when it comes to university, regardless of how long they have lived here. This means they are ineligible for student loans, and universities can charge them fees which are several times the current £9,000 maximum payable by home students.

 

Just for Kids Law intervened in the case on behalf of the Let us Learn campaign (see below). The charity provided the court with examples of dozens of young people who are also blocked from university education because of restrictions on student finance which were introduced three years ago (see below).

 

The Supreme Court ruled that a blanket ban on student loans to anyone who doesn’t have either ‘indefinite leave to remain’ (ILR) in the UK or British citizenship, regardless of their length of residence or strength of their ties to the country, was disproportionate and could not be justified.

 

Giving the lead judgment, Lady Hale, deputy president of the Supreme Court, said:

 

‘The reality is, even though she [T] does not have ILR, her established private life here means that she cannot be removed from the UK unless she commits a serious criminal offence and she will almost inevitably secure ILR in due course. She is just as closely connected and integrated into the UK society as her settled peers.’ (para 35)

 

Explaining the court’s reasoning, Lady Hale said:

 

‘These young people will…find it hard to understand why they are allowed access to all the public services, including cash welfare benefits, but are denied access to this one benefit, which is a repayable loan.’

 

The respondent in the case was the Department for Business Innovation and Skills (BIS). The court heard that BIS’s own research, conducted in 2013 by Prof Ian Walker from the department of economics at Lancaster University, showed that male graduates pay £264,000 more in tax during their working lives than non-graduate males; women graduates pay £318,000 more tax than non-graduate women. (para 11)

 

Prof Walker gave evidence in the case, stating:

 

‘The implication is that there would be sizeable gains to the exchequer in the long run to extending student loans to this relatively small group’. (para 12)

 

Just for Kids Law estimates that around 600-1,000 students a year have been affected since the restrictions were introduced in 2012.

 

Lady Hale said:

 

‘…the numbers affected are not insignificant but a tiny proportion of the student loans which are made every year.’ (para 10)

 

In his judgment, Lord Hughes said there is no evidence that BIS considered the impact on young people with strong ties to the UK, whose future is clearly here, when it amended the rules.

 

Welcoming the judgment, Just for Kids Law director Shauneen Lambe said:

 

‘This ruling is wonderful news for many ambitious and academically successful young people, who would otherwise be blocked from ever entering professions which require a degree. We look forward to working with government to make sure their ability to get a loan is restored in time for this year’s A-level results day on 13 August, so that students who have achieved their grades have the chance to take up their university places in the autumn.’

 

For more information, or to interview a young person involved in the Let us Learn campaign, contact Fiona Bawdon 07740 644474; fionabawdon@justforkidslaw.org; or Caroline O’Dwyer 07984 095793; carolineo’dwyer@justforkidslaw.org

 

Notes for editors

 

  1. R (on the application of Tigere (Appellant) v Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (Respondent); [2015] UKSC 57.

 

  1. In 2011, the criteria for student finance were changed by the Education (Student Fees, Award and Support (Amendment) Regulations 2011; now been superseded by the Education (Student Support) Regulations 2011. The change took effect from 2012 onwards.

 

  1. Prior to 2011, students with discretionary or limited leave to remain were eligible for student loans: the Education Student Support Regulations 2009 provided that a ‘person with leave to enter or remain’ was eligible. Case law (R (Arogundade) v SSBIS [2012] EWHC 2502 (Admin)) then clarified that people with DLR and LLR fell within that definition.

 

  1. The solicitors acting for the appellant are Paul Heron, Padraig Hughes and Emily McFadden, of Public Interest Lawyers.

 

  1. Just for Kids Law’s intervention on behalf of the Let us Learn campaign was led by senior education solicitor Rachel Knowles, with pro bono support from barristers at Matrix Chambers: David Wolfe QC, Karon Monaghan QC, Sarah Hannett, and Nick Armstrong.

 

  1. Our evidence to the court includes witness statements from 36 young people we have worked with directly, who have been blocked from attending university because of lack of access to student finance, following the 2011 amendment. (More information on request.)

 

  1. Our intervention was supported by Mossbourne Academy head teacher Peter Hughes. In Peter Hughes’ statement to the court, he said:

‘We teach every pupil that if they work hard, they can achieve their goals and choose to go to university, if they would like. However, it has been devastating to learn that, for a number of our pupils, this is simply not the case, because they cannot access student finance due to not having indefinite leave to remain or citizenship.’

 

  1. The National Union of Teachers also raised concerns about the impact of the 2011 change on schools and social mobility.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/migrants-legally-living-in-uk-being-deprived-of-chance-to-go-to-university-says-teachers-leader-10335251.html

 

  1. Just for Kids Law is an award-winning charity which supports children and young people in difficulty. www.justforkidslaw.org

 

  1. Let us Learn was set up in 2013 by former head girl Chrisann Jarrett, after she found she was unable to take up a place at the London School of Economics to study law, because she could not access student finance. http://hackneycitizen.co.uk/2014/09/10/former-hackney-schoolgirl-starts-campaign-let-us-learn-migrant-students-higher-education/

 

  1. Education is a devolved power and England is the only country in the UK where students with DLR and LLR are entirely ruled out from receiving student loans.

 

 

ENDS

 

 


Supreme Court to hear case this week which will decide educational future of thousands

Young people whose chances of going to university hang on the result of the judges’ ruling, are to demonstrate outside the Supreme Court on Wednesday 24 June 2015.

 

Just for Kids Law has been granted permission to provide evidence of the impact of student finance restrictions on lawfully resident, British-educated students, who do not yet have citizenship.

 

A case which will determine whether hundreds of students who achieve success in their A-level results this August are able to take up university places comes before the Supreme Court tomorrow.

 

The Supreme Court judges will be asked to rule on whether a 2011 change to the government’s student loan scheme is discriminatory and amounts to a denial of university education. Since 2012, when the change came into effect, children who are lawfully resident in the UK, having ‘discretionary’ or ‘limited’ leave to remain, are no longer eligible for student loans.

 

The change means young people who have been here most of their lives and attended British schools, are now treated as overseas students when it comes to university education. They are now no longer eligible for student loans, and universities can charge them international fees, which are several times higher than those paid by home students. The regulation amendment takes no account of the fact that many will come from families which work and pay tax here.

 

The Let us Learn campaign – which was set up by Just for Kids Law in 2013 – works directly with dozens of ambitious young people who have been blocked from taking up their university places. A group of them will be staging a peaceful protest outside the Supreme Court on Wednesday to highlight the importance of the case to their futures.

 

Among those who plan to join Wednesday’s protest are:

 

– Emmanuel (see below), who attended the flagship academy school Mossbourne in Hackney, and achieved three A-levels at grade A. He has been unable to take up a place to study chemistry at Imperial College.

 

– Mistura, 18, who finished taking her A-level exams last week, and is predicted to get A*A*A. She has had offers from three Russell Group universities to do chemical engineering, but has no access to finance to enable her to take up her place. Chemical engineering is an area where black women are significantly under represented, and Mistura would be the first member of her family to go to university.

 

– Dami who has three A-levels, including A in psychology, and has been unable to take up her offered place at Royal Holloway University of London, to study criminology and sociology. Dami wants to work in youth justice, but thinks this will be impossible without a degree, and is currently working in a sportswear shop. Many of her peers are graduating this year and she feels left behind.

 

Let Us Learn estimates that around 600 young people a year have been affected since the rule change came into effect in 2012.

 

Just for Kids Law’s intervention in the case is being led by in-house education solicitor Rachel Knowles, who says:

 

‘Let us Learn has been contacted by many, many young people who have lived here most of their lives, and whose futures are clearly in the UK. They have been through our primary schools, secondary schools and sixth forms. They have worked hard, got good grades and are a credit to the British education system. It cannot be right that when they want to go to university, we suddenly say to them that they are no different from someone who has never set foot in the UK and just wants to come here to study. Since 2012, they have been denied access to student loans and are charged overseas rates by universities, which can be up to £26,000 a year – way beyond the reach of most ordinary families. It makes no sense to let so much aspiration and ambition go to waste, and we call on the government to let these young people fulfill their potential.’

 

Emmanuel, 20, a Let us Learn campaigner, who will be attending Wednesday’s protest says:

 

‘The government is always saying we need to invest in Britain and make Britain great again, and they’re not giving the opportunity to those who actually want to make that difference. Everyone involved in Let us Learn has massive ambitions, and they’re being held back by legislation which to me makes no sense. That needs to change.’

 

Emmanuel’s former head teacher, Peter Hughes from Mossbourne Academy, is backing Just for Kids Law’s intervention in the Supreme Court case. In written evidence to be put before the Supreme Court, he says:

 

‘We teach every pupil that if they work hard they can achieve their goals and choose to go university, if they would like. However it has been devastating to learn that, for a number of our pupils, this is simply not the case, because they cannot access student finance due to not having indefinite leave to remain or [British] citizenship.’

 

The National Union of Teachers and leading business figures have also added their voices to calls for reform in this area (see below).

 

For more information, or to interview a young person affected by the Supreme Court case, contact Fiona Bawdon 07740 644474; fionabawdon@justforkidslaw.org; or Caroline O’Dwyer 07984 095793; carolineo’dwyer@justforkidslaw.org

 

Notes for editors

 

  1. In 2011, the criteria for student finance were changed by the Education (Student Fees, Award and Support (Amendment) Regulations 2011; now been superseded by the Education (Student Support) Regulations 2011. The change took effect from 2012 onwards.

 

  1. Prior to 2011, students with discretionary or limited leave to remain were eligible for student loans: the Education Student Support Regulations 2009 provided that a ‘person with leave to enter or remain’ was eligible. Case law (R (Arogundade) v SSBIS [2012] EWHC 2502 (Admin)) then clarified that people with DLR and LLR fell within that definition.

 

  1. The case of ‘T’ is listed at the Supreme Court for 24 June 2015. Just for Kids Law is respecting the request of the appellant that her name not be used for publicity purposes. The solicitor in the case is Paul Heron of Public Interest Lawyers.

 

  1. Just for Kids Law has been granted permission to intervene in the case. The intervention is being led by our education solicitor Rachel Knowles, with pro bono support from barristers at Matrix Chambers: David Wolfe QC, Sarah Hannett, Nick Armstrong and Karon Monaghan QC.

 

  1. Our evidence to the court includes witness statements from 26 young people we work with directly, who have been blocked from attending university because of lack of access to student finance, following the 2011 amendment.

 

  1. Our evidence also includes a detailed statement from Mossbourne Academy head teacher Peter Hughes. Mossbourne, based in Hackney, has been described by former education minister Lord Adonis as: ‘The flagship of the national academy movement.’ It is within the top 1 per cent of schools in the country, and is on the site of Hackney Downs School, which was once described as the worst school in Britain.

 

  1. In Peter Hughes’ statement to the court, he says:

 

‘All of our students and staff have worked hard to create the high achieving school community that we have at Mossbourne. We have worked hard to achieve and exceed the targets set by the government: to turn around a school, to create positive change in the community by encourage pupils, in particular those from BME backgrounds (and boys in particular), to become role models for the community. We teach every pupil that if they work hard, they can achieve their goals and choose to go to university, if they would like. However, it has been devastating to learn that, for a number of our pupils, this is simply not the case, because they cannot access student finance due to not having indefinite leave to remain or citizenship.’ (10)

 

  1. The National Union of Teachers has expressed concern about the impact of the 2011 change on schools and social cohesion. Its general secretary Christine Blower wrote a letter to the Independent saying:

 

‘It cannot be right that young people, who have lived in this country lawfully and been educated here most of their lives, are being denied a university education and the chance to better themselves. They have done everything demanded of them, by studying hard at school and getting good qualifications, only to be denied a place at university through no fault of their own.

 

‘We urge the Government to resolve this issue as a matter of urgency in the interests of fairness and social cohesion. It is a clear block on social mobility. ‘

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/migrants-legally-living-in-uk-being-deprived-of-chance-to-go-to-university-says-teachers-leader-10335251.html?origin=internalSearch

 

  1. According to figures from the Department for Business Innovation and Skills the economic benefit of a degree is significant. BIS estimates that a working graduate male pays £264,000 more in tax over his entire career, than a working male non-graduate; for women, the difference is even greater: a working female graduate pays £318,000 more tax during her career than a working non-graduate woman.

 

  1. In its evidence to the Supreme Court, the government claims the cost of allowing students with DLR and LLR to access student loans would be prohibitively expensive and estimates that around 2,400 young people a year would be affected. Just for Kids Law’s research, based on FOI requests, suggests this is a considerable over estimate, and puts the figure at around 500-600 a year. However, even an additional 2,400 loans a year is small compared with the increase in student loans that will be offered following chancellor George Osborne’s decision in the 2013 Autumn Statement to lift the cap on overall numbers of students. This is expected to create an extra 60,000 places a year for students who will be able to apply for student loans.

 

  1. Just for Kids Law is an award-winning charity which supports children and young people in difficulty. www.justforkidslaw.org

 

  1. Let us Learn is a young person-led campaign, supported by Just for Kids Law, and was inspired by the United We Dream youth led movement in the USA. (http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/feb/19/carlos-saavedra-kept-dream-alive) It was set up in 2013 by former head girl Chrisann Jarrett, after she found she was unable to take up a place at the London School of Economics to study law, because she could not access student finance. http://hackneycitizen.co.uk/2014/09/10/former-hackney-schoolgirl-starts-campaign-let-us-learn-migrant-students-higher-education/

 

  1. Education is a devolved power and England is the only country in the UK where students with DLR and ILR are entirely ruled out from receiving student loans.

 

  1. Baroness Martha Lane Fox, chancellor of the Open University, Founder of Lastminute.com and patron of Just for Kids Law says: ‘We should be helping talented young people get into university not creating insurmountable barriers. The UK needs to find a million jobs in the tech sector by 2020. Allowing these young people to achieve their dreams also benefits the UK economy –it’s a win, win situation.’

 

ENDS


Shauneen Lambe selected as Eisenhower Fellow 2015

Shauneen Lambe, Executive Director of Just for Kids Law, has been selected for the Eisenhower Fellowships Women’s Leadership Program (WLP) 2015. Shauneen is one of just two women from the United Kingdom selected to participate in the prestigious leadership programme for outstanding professionals.

George de Lama, president of Eisenhower Fellowships, said the new Fellows represent the best and brightest leaders in their fields. “We are excited to welcome these outstanding ascendant leaders into the global network of influential Eisenhower Fellows,” de Lama said.

Shauneen is one of 25 international Fellows selected from hundreds of applicants from 37 countries. As an Eisenhower Fellow she will have the opportunity to meet other leaders in their respective fields, and travel to six to eight cities in the U.S. During the programme, the Fellows are expected to use this unique opportunity to identify concrete ways in which they can better their communities and advance their professional disciplines.

To qualify, participants have to demonstrate that they are exceptional leaders who make important contributions to their societies. They have to provide evidence of their professional and community accomplishments, and show substantial promise for even higher achievement. Judges are looking for visionaries who have tackled big challenges in order to better the world around them.

Shauneen Lambe said: ‘I am honoured to have been selected as an Eisenhower Fellow. I look forward to the learning journey and the many opportunities it will bring to enhance the work Just for Kids Law does here in the UK and an amazing opportunity to learn from the other Eisenhower Fellows.’

Ends

  1. Shauneen is a barrister in the UK and an attorney in the USA, where she represented people facing the death penalty. She helped establish the charity Reprieve for Clive Stafford Smith and remained a board member until 2006. In 2006, with Aika Stephenson, she founded Just for Kids Law. Shauneen was chosen as World Economic Forum ‘Young Global Leader’ in 2010; a Shackleton Leader in 2011; one of NESTA/The Observer’s ‘Britain’s New Radicals’ in 2012 and was elected an Ashoka Fellow in the same year. In 2013 she was a finalist in the Legal Aid Lawyer of the Year Awards and Liberty’s Human Rights Lawyer of the Year.  She is proud to be the UK Chair of Global Dignity and a trustee of the charities Birthrights and The Barings Foundation.
  2. The Eisenhower Fellowship, founded in 1953, is an international leader exchange programme to honour President Eisenhower’s devotion to world peace. Its Board of Trustees include Madeline Albright and Colin Powell.
  3. For further information about this award please see here
  4. Just for Kids Law is an award-winning charity which provides legal and other support to young people in difficulties with the law and campaigns for improvements in youth justice. justforkidslaw.org

For further information contact Caroline O’Dwyer T: 0203 174 2279 M. 07984 095793